Showing posts with label winter. Show all posts
Showing posts with label winter. Show all posts

Saturday, December 2, 2017

Important Winter Survival Tips


We would all like to hope that an emergency or survival situation would only hit us when the weather is tolerable. In fact, when planning our bug out bags and gear, we aren’t usually thinking about harsh winter weather. The fact is, however, that an emergency can happen at any time and it is always best to be prepared for anything.

Winter Emergencies

A storm can knock our power out at any time, during any season. It most often happens in the spring, when windstorms are often the case. However, winter storms can do the same thing. The problems are intensified however, as there are more problems.

With any power outage, we have to be careful about food we have in freezers and having a method to cook without electricity. In the winter months, however, we have all that plus the problem of staying warm. Additionally, spring storms usually only leave us without power for a matter of hours. In the winter, snow and ice can leave us without power for days or weeks, making the situation even more dire.

Some Important Winter Emergency Tips

Here are some tips that we hope will help you, should you find yourself in an emergency situation during harsh winter temperatures. While we cannot list all the things that could possibly happen, we hope this list is at least a good start for you.



To start with, make sure you wear warm clothes. While this might sound like a no-brainer, it can often be so simple that it is often left off until it’s too late. Wearing the right clothes is even more important if you will have to be doing any traveling or work outside in the cold weather.

If you have to venture out, make sure your attire is thick and windproof, above all else. Packing extra if you have very far to go is another good idea, as you never know when or if you might become stuck or stranded. While the body is capable of withstanding some extreme circumstances, you certainly don’t want to underestimate winter’s harsh reality.

Next, you will want to make sure to wear the right kind of boots. Tennis shoes or other types of footwear might work for a short time, but if you have to be outside for such things as clearing away snow from doors and windows or splitting and carrying firewood, you will be miserable much quicker with the wrong shoes. Boots should be insulated well and rated for cold weather.



Staying dry is one of the most important things to remember if you have to be out in the weather. You can become damp or even wet if you have to do any strenuous activity that makes you sweat, or if you have to deal with melting snow and ice. In either situation, this dampness can quickly lead to hypothermia, which is a deadly situation in which to find yourself. If you find that you have become sweaty or wet, make sure to change your clothes as soon as possible. Otherwise, wrap yourself in a blanket and stay out of the direct wind as much as you can.

When Your Body Uses More Energy

In order to deal with the stress of colder temperatures, your body will use a lot more energy in order to produce heat from the inside out. Because of this, you will need to make sure that you have plenty of food to keep yourself nourished, as well as ample amounts of good, clean drinking water for proper hydration. Eating can also hasten the warming process as your body goes about the business of digestion.

In situations where you run out of water, never eat ice or unmelted snow. Doing so will only cause your internal body temperature to fall that much quicker. If you must resort to eating snow or ice, make sure to heat it, preferably to boiling to make sure it’s safe, before ingesting it.

Be Aware of Your Heart Rate

When you get cold, you may want to just sit down and stay as still as possible, but that is one of the worst things you could do. As your body temperature drops, your heart rate does as well. This is dangerous because the slower the blood flows through your veins, the slower heat is passed through the body.

A good way to deal with this situation is to do take part in some simple exercises that will get your heart pumping faster. For instance, jogging in place, swinging your arms or doing jumping jacks should get your heart pumping again. Just make sure not to exercise so hard that you start sweating because remember – you want to stay dry.

Do not Panic!

Above all, do not waste the time and energy in a state of panic. During all emergencies, a level head is one of the most precious possessions to have, and never more so than when the weather is treacherously cold. Instead of stressing, adapt to your environment. As a prepper, you should at least be somewhat aware of the precautions needed in a cold weather situation.

If you have not yet thought to learn about cold weather emergencies or survival skills, it’s never too late to start learning! Read books, blogs, guides or anything else you can get your hands on to learn as many tactics as possible to deal with an emergency in harsh winters.

You might want to learn different ways to start a fire, and different techniques on which fires work best for particular situations. An example would be, knowing the difference between starting a fire for the most heat as quickly as possible and starting a fire that will burn longer at a steady cooking temperature.




It is also a good idea to familiarize yourself with first aid techniques that are needed for weather related illnesses such as frostbite or hypothermia. Not knowing how to treat these very common problems can be disastrous when they are really needed!

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Vehicle Tips For Winter Survival Situation



During the winter, there are a lot more opportunities for things to go wrong in a survival situation. In fact, being stranded in certain geographical areas could cause great health problems and even death. That’s why it is so important that you be prepared with a proper vehicle survival kit.

The kit should be kept in your car throughout the winter, especially if you often travel in sparsely populated areas. It could potentially become a life saving kit, for you as well as your passengers.

General Vehicle Survival Tips
When it comes to survival, we cannot stress “preparation” enough! This is definitely the case when it comes to your vehicle. Prep it and make sure it stays prepped at all times. For instance, make sure your gas tank has an ample supply of gas, given the terrain you will be traveling. Also, we sure to check your antifreeze before each trip.

It’s a lot easier for someone to come to your aid if you’re easy to find. Tell a trusted friend or family member where you’re headed, what route you plan to take and make sure you contact them once you arrive at your destination. Let them know that if they don’t hear from you, that they should first contact the area to which you are going. If you did not reach your destination, they will know which way to go and greatly increase your chances of survival.



If your vehicle becomes stuck, make sure to leave a flag tied to an antenna and keep those dome lights turned on. Rescue personnel can see the smallest glow in the distance, especially at night and in the snow. If you’re worried about draining your battery, keep an ear out for approaching emergency vehicles and only use your emergency flashers at that time.

If Forced To Stay In Your Vehicle
If you do become stuck, it’s always questionable as to whether you should get out and go for help or just stay in the car. We suggest the latter in most cases. Walking in a winter storm can be incredibly dangerous and it’s easy for exhaustion to set it in cold weather. Your vehicle makes a good shelter, and you won’t suddenly find yourself lost.

However, if you have been in your car for a longer period of time, there are other things to keep in mind. For instance, if the snow is falling hard and fast, your exhaust can become blocked or plugged. Continuing to run the vehicle in this situation will cause carbon monoxide to build up inside the car, which can be deadly in a very short period of time.



If this is the case, only run the car for ten minutes on every hour. Make sure that the exhaust is free of snow, if possible and keep your windows cracked while the engine is running, just in case. It’s better to be cold than to risk the outcome of staying warm.

Avoid Overexertion
If you become trapped in a snow storm, it’s very tempting to try to free yourself, in any way that you can. However, pushing the vehicle or attempting to shovel snow to free the vehicle takes a lot more effort in extreme weather conditions than it normally would.

Don’t attempt this, as you could sustain an injurty that would make things worse, or you might possibly have a heart attack. Additionally, you will become hot and sweaty. While warming up always sounds like a good idea in the extreme cold, the aftermath could cause frostbite or death. Wet garments that have become sweat-soaked will quickly lose their insulative properties and can cause hypothermia.

Put Together A Survival Kit For Your Vehicle
We mentioned a survival kit earlier, and now we’re going to tell you a few items you should make sure to include. While you may not use every single one of them, it’s always better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it!



Here’s what you have in a kit in your vehicle during the winter:

  • A shovel, for keeping the exhaust free of snow buildup or to move a light amount of snow from around your tires.
  • A scraper for your windshield, or a small hand broom. It’s important that rescuers and emergency personnel be able to see inside the vehicle.
  • A flashlight with an extra supply of batteries. In the event that your car battery dies, a flashlight can be used to alert rescuers to your location.
  • A battery powered emergency radio. Not only will it give you something to listen to in order to pass the time, it can keep you up to date on any special weather conditions and whether they will let up or worsen.
  • An ample supply of water. Always keep at least enough for 24 hours, but if you have room, keep more.
  • Snack foods. Make sure you have snacks that provide ample energy and are of the utmost nutritional value. In any emergency situation, nutrition is important, but even more so during cold weather.
  • Matches, candles or other small items such as this. This will make sure you don’t use up all the battery power of the car’s battery or your flashlight batteries.
  • Extra pairs of socks, mittens and hats. Remember that in cold weather, dressing in layers is always the best route. It’s one of the main cold-weather survival skills taught in the military.
  • First aid kit.
  • Any medications that you simply cannot do without. This would include medications for blood pressure, diabetes and breathing disorders such as asthma, which can be made worse by cold weather.
  • Blankets or a sleeping bag. This adds another layer of insulation for protection against the elements and can sometimes be used by more than one person. Two people inside one sleeping bag, especially children, can create more heat than just one alone.
  • Tow chain or a rope that is big enough to tow  a vehicle. If you happen to be found by someone other than emergency workers who are well equipped, having this one item could potentially be a life saver.
  • Sand, cat litter or road salt.
  • Booster cables.
  • Emergency flares. These can be used to alert someone to your location who may not be very close to you.

If possible, store the kit inside the vehicle instead of the trunk. In extremely low temperatures, the trunk lid can become jammed or even freeze shut. A kit you can’t get to is like having no kit at all, so think ahead.