Showing posts with label plants. Show all posts
Showing posts with label plants. Show all posts

Monday, July 2, 2018

Naturally Fertilizing Your Survival Garden


Naturally Fertilizing Your Survival Garden



A survival garden is an important part of any prepper’s spring and summer plans. Seriously, what can be better than growing your own food and stockpiling it as a means of long-term supply.

For one thing, you will be better able to meet your dietary needs, and those of your family members, and it doesn’t really take very much space to do it. Preppers in some of the most urband settings are proving that container gardening can be just as beneficial as having a plot of rural land to grow on. So there are really no major excuses when it comes to growing food.

No matter how you choose to grow your food, the fact is that your gardens can always benefit from a healthy natural fertilizer. It’s also less expensive than purchasing fertilizer, and more sustainable, as there may be none left to buy at some point. At some point, it may be impossible not only to buy it, but even to travel to a place where there might be an availability.

Learn the Ins and Outs of Composting



It actually takes very little to learn the few steps in takes to make a compost material. This material is a great way to reuse food scraps and items that otherwise get thrown away while creating a plant boost that is rich in nutrients. This is one of the best materials to start your seeds in, before transplanting them to a garden plot or outdoor container. Using compost can even create a richer soil for the following garden season as well.

What Nutrients Does the Soil Need?
One of the most important steps in knowing how to make your own natural fertilizer is knowing what nutrients are necessary for proper plant health in the first place. Nutrients are necessary for plants to grow and even more important to keep those plants flourishing and producing. When it comes to survival gardening, a non-producing plant is a useless one.

Some of the most important nutrients needed include:

  • Phosphorus
  • Potassium
  • Nitrogen
  • Calcium
  • Magnesium
  • Sulfur
  • Boron
  • Iron
  • Manganese
  • Zinc

Natural Fertilizers


Egg shells are great for increasing the amount of calcium in your soil. This helps seeds and plants to develop on a cellular level, for a great start. Shells also have nitrogen and phosphoric acid in them, in some amount, but it is calcium that is most easily depleted throughout the growth process. Grind the egg shells into a powder form and simply sprinkle the powder all around your plants.





Coffee grounds are what you want to use for plants that need a soil rich in acidity, such as tomatoes, blueberries and avocados. The grounds help to increase levels of potassium, nitrogen and magnesium and can even raise the pH level in the soil.










Epsom salt is a long time homestead favorite for the garden, although it isn’t exactly common knowledge. Plants will grow healthier and foods such as broccoli, onions and cabbage will be sweeter. Some gardeners use it on tomato and pepper plants for stronger stems, extra blossoms and also for the sweeter flavor it adds. The Epsom salt helps by adding sulfur and magnesium to the soil. A good mixture is made by adding a tablespoon of salts to one called of water. You can use this to spray directly onto the plants at two week intervals. Epsom salts can also be applied directly to the ground around newly transplanted plants for an added boost.

Banana peels can be used to add an extra kick of potassium to the soil. You never have to worry about adding too much, as it is absolutely impossible to have too much potassium in the garden. No ill effects will be suffered, no matter how much you use. To utilize the peels, simply shred them into thin strips, placing them in a circular fashion around the base of your plants.

While it seems a bit voodoo-like, hair can be added to the garden for a richer nitrogen content. You can use human hair, dog hair, cat hair or any other kind of hair, so long as it is free from any type of hair product, flea shampoo, etc. For a greater amount of hair, you might volunteer to sweep up freshly washed and cut hair from a local salon to always have plenty on hand.

Seaweed is an excellent fertilizer option if you happen to live on the ocean, or even if you frequently vacation in areas on the waterfront. Make sure to pick up the seaweed to transport back to your garden. In order to keep the nasty smell from creating havoc, make sure you wash it and let it air dry before storing or transporting it. To use it, finely chop two cups of seaweed and mix it with equal amounts of water. The two cups will be enough to use around the base of small plants. Use four cups for medium sized plants and six cups for large plants.

If you’ve ever had or known someone who had a garden, then you’re probably use to hearing about using manure to fertilize crops. You can use manure that has been composted from cows, horses, chickens and even rabbits to cover many different kinds of plants. Rabbit manure is particularly good to use when growing tomatoes. Manure supplies a ready host of great nutrients to the soil and even deters many insects that would otherwise eat your plants. Steer clear of putting fresh manure on your plants, though. It’s possible to kill them this way.




Friday, March 16, 2018

Spring Foraging Survival Skills


When you think about sprint time, you may think of things like new wildlife being born or an abundance of new plant life popping up everything. Spring seems to be the highlight of abundance and new life, across the board. However, even though you might not imagine it, it’s just as easy to starve in the spring if you are completely dependant on wild food. In fact, spring is one of the leanest times of year.

In some areas, spring is known as “the starving season”, and for this very reason, the fall stockpile was laid up not only for the winter, but for the spring as well. There may be a great deal of plant life to eat at this time, but there aren’t many calories in what you might find. So if springtime survival becomes key for you, here are some important resources to keep in mind.

Dandelion

You can eat dandelion roots both raw and cooked, but they are incredibly bitter in the raw stage. This often discourages anyone from eating them. They are touch and are usually best used in stir frying, stewing or sliced and turned into snack chips. They are high in iron, boron, potassium, silicon, calcium and vitamin C.

Ounce for ounce, dandelion roots have even more beta carotene than carrots do. If you happen to have a craving for coffee, you can even chop and roast these roots into an alternative. There is no caffeine, but there is a bit of a coffee flavor. True coffee connoisseurs disagree on that flavor. Simply roast the roots beside your fire or in an oven, if you have one, until they become dark and brittle. They can be stored for future use, or you can use it immediately, soaking a teaspoon of the root in scalding hot water for about fifteen minutes. You can then strain it and sweeten it to your taste.



Thistle

Across the Northern Hemisphere of the United States and North America, you will find lots of different thistle species. There are none in the United States that are toxic to humans, but you will find some that taste far more bitter than others. Harvesting them is easy, as you’ll only need to use a shovel or some similar device to pull the roots up, then cut off the tops, which are spiny. The remaining portion of the root can then be washed, chopped up and eaten immediately, if you wish. Or, just like any other root vegetable, they can be fried, stewed or even simmered, and then eaten.

Wild Onion

There are about a dozen wild onion species in North America, some of which even grow well in the winter. They prefer sunny conditions, right out in the open, so you’re more likely to find them in meadows or fields, or maybe even in your very own yard. Some seem more like garlic, both in flavor and looks, while others more closely resemble and taste like chives.

However tasty these plants are to the general population, make sure you don’t just forage and eat everything that seems to be shaped like an onion. The fact is, they still belong to the lily family, and it’s one that does contain some toxic plants. First, make sure you’re really dealing with the onion class of the family by looking for the bulbous roots and round stem. Once you’ve verified the looks, then you can do the scratch and sniff test. Just bruise the bulb or top portion of the plant. If it’s the edible variety, you will immediately smell that familiar onion/garlic smell. You will be able to use these in the same way your would use onions bought from a store, cooked or raw.

Reasons To Consider Foraging

Even if you aren’t in a survival situation, spring foraging can be incredibly beneficial. There are as many economic benefits as there are survival benefits, and well worth knowing about. Consider these factors:

  • Foraged food is free food, and makes an excellent alternative to organic produce that is often overly priced.
  • Foraging is possible almost all year long, if you know what to look for and how to harvest it.
  • Foraging can add to the wealth you harvest from a garden, or replace it all together.
  • Foraging is a great way to get outside and get moving, so it’s beneficial as a means of exercise.
  • Foraging familiarizes you with the immediate surroundings of your location.
  • Food found through foraging is naturally higher in nutrients than foods you find in commercial settings, there is no genetic alterations of any kind, and the soil in which it is grown hasn’t been depleted by years of industrial farming.

Important Foraging Rules

The best way to learn to forage is to do so under the training of someone who is experienced in foraging. If you cannot find one, or a group in your local area, the next best advice is to get yourself a really good-quality edible plant guide book. Once you begin your foraging journey, be sure to adhere to these basic foraging rules:

  • Don’t pick anything you don’t readily recognize and most certainly do not eat it.
  • Take your guidebook with you – preferably a very good one.
  • Never pick a plant that looks as if it has a disease of any kind.
  • Wash everything well before eating it.
  • Keep an eye out for bugs, snakes and other dangerous creatures that often use plants as hideouts.
  • Wear gloves and other protective clothing in case you come in contact with poison ivy or other such plants.
  • Stay in areas you are familiar with, so that you don’t accidentally get lost.
  • Do not forage on private property unless you first get permission from the known landowner.
  • Do not forage in national forests or public parks unless you are sure it’s permissible to do so. Some foraging is banned in areas such as these.

Thursday, October 26, 2017

Ten Plants People Should Not Grow Or Plant

By Karen Roguski


Many varieties of plants can be a huge nuisance to yards, gardens, homesteads, and even forests. This is because they are known as space invaders; unlike the classic video game, these stemmy products are often very hard to kill. Protect the survival of your land by avoiding the following examples of space invaders.


Vicia Hirsuta also known as Tiny Vetch



Photo courtesy of Wikimedia


Verbesina Encelioides also known as Golden Crownbeard



Photo courtesy of Wikipedia


Stachys Floridana also known as Florida Betony



Photo courtesy of Wikimedia


Hedera Helix also known as English Ivy


Photo courtesy of Wikipedia


Barbadensis Mill also known as Aloe Vera



Photo courtesy of Ebay

Amorpha Fruticosa also known as Indigobush



Photo courtesy of Wikipedia


Elaeagnus Angustifolia also known as Russian Olive



Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

Arceuthobium Cyanocarpa also known as Limber Pine Dwarf Mistletoe



Photo courtesy of Wikipedia


Acacia spp. P. Mill also known as Acacia



Photo courtesy of Wikipedia


Achillea Millefolium L. also known as Common Yarrow



Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

Here one can find a more complete listing of those stemmy pests that dominate in the United States. We here at Family Survival Farm hopes that knowing in advance the ill effects found with the above plants can assist your land area in a positive manner to help one thrive.