Showing posts with label organic. Show all posts
Showing posts with label organic. Show all posts

Friday, March 16, 2018

Spring Foraging Survival Skills


When you think about sprint time, you may think of things like new wildlife being born or an abundance of new plant life popping up everything. Spring seems to be the highlight of abundance and new life, across the board. However, even though you might not imagine it, it’s just as easy to starve in the spring if you are completely dependant on wild food. In fact, spring is one of the leanest times of year.

In some areas, spring is known as “the starving season”, and for this very reason, the fall stockpile was laid up not only for the winter, but for the spring as well. There may be a great deal of plant life to eat at this time, but there aren’t many calories in what you might find. So if springtime survival becomes key for you, here are some important resources to keep in mind.

Dandelion

You can eat dandelion roots both raw and cooked, but they are incredibly bitter in the raw stage. This often discourages anyone from eating them. They are touch and are usually best used in stir frying, stewing or sliced and turned into snack chips. They are high in iron, boron, potassium, silicon, calcium and vitamin C.

Ounce for ounce, dandelion roots have even more beta carotene than carrots do. If you happen to have a craving for coffee, you can even chop and roast these roots into an alternative. There is no caffeine, but there is a bit of a coffee flavor. True coffee connoisseurs disagree on that flavor. Simply roast the roots beside your fire or in an oven, if you have one, until they become dark and brittle. They can be stored for future use, or you can use it immediately, soaking a teaspoon of the root in scalding hot water for about fifteen minutes. You can then strain it and sweeten it to your taste.



Thistle

Across the Northern Hemisphere of the United States and North America, you will find lots of different thistle species. There are none in the United States that are toxic to humans, but you will find some that taste far more bitter than others. Harvesting them is easy, as you’ll only need to use a shovel or some similar device to pull the roots up, then cut off the tops, which are spiny. The remaining portion of the root can then be washed, chopped up and eaten immediately, if you wish. Or, just like any other root vegetable, they can be fried, stewed or even simmered, and then eaten.

Wild Onion

There are about a dozen wild onion species in North America, some of which even grow well in the winter. They prefer sunny conditions, right out in the open, so you’re more likely to find them in meadows or fields, or maybe even in your very own yard. Some seem more like garlic, both in flavor and looks, while others more closely resemble and taste like chives.

However tasty these plants are to the general population, make sure you don’t just forage and eat everything that seems to be shaped like an onion. The fact is, they still belong to the lily family, and it’s one that does contain some toxic plants. First, make sure you’re really dealing with the onion class of the family by looking for the bulbous roots and round stem. Once you’ve verified the looks, then you can do the scratch and sniff test. Just bruise the bulb or top portion of the plant. If it’s the edible variety, you will immediately smell that familiar onion/garlic smell. You will be able to use these in the same way your would use onions bought from a store, cooked or raw.

Reasons To Consider Foraging

Even if you aren’t in a survival situation, spring foraging can be incredibly beneficial. There are as many economic benefits as there are survival benefits, and well worth knowing about. Consider these factors:

  • Foraged food is free food, and makes an excellent alternative to organic produce that is often overly priced.
  • Foraging is possible almost all year long, if you know what to look for and how to harvest it.
  • Foraging can add to the wealth you harvest from a garden, or replace it all together.
  • Foraging is a great way to get outside and get moving, so it’s beneficial as a means of exercise.
  • Foraging familiarizes you with the immediate surroundings of your location.
  • Food found through foraging is naturally higher in nutrients than foods you find in commercial settings, there is no genetic alterations of any kind, and the soil in which it is grown hasn’t been depleted by years of industrial farming.

Important Foraging Rules

The best way to learn to forage is to do so under the training of someone who is experienced in foraging. If you cannot find one, or a group in your local area, the next best advice is to get yourself a really good-quality edible plant guide book. Once you begin your foraging journey, be sure to adhere to these basic foraging rules:

  • Don’t pick anything you don’t readily recognize and most certainly do not eat it.
  • Take your guidebook with you – preferably a very good one.
  • Never pick a plant that looks as if it has a disease of any kind.
  • Wash everything well before eating it.
  • Keep an eye out for bugs, snakes and other dangerous creatures that often use plants as hideouts.
  • Wear gloves and other protective clothing in case you come in contact with poison ivy or other such plants.
  • Stay in areas you are familiar with, so that you don’t accidentally get lost.
  • Do not forage on private property unless you first get permission from the known landowner.
  • Do not forage in national forests or public parks unless you are sure it’s permissible to do so. Some foraging is banned in areas such as these.

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Foods You Can Regrow and Eat Over More Than Once




By Karen Roguski


Fresh foods, as we all know, lead to a healthy lifestyle. These healthy foods, however, are often some of the more expensive items on one's grocery list.


Today, we offer options and solutions to homesteading, survival, frugal living, and so much more. The following tricks will change the way you shop, cook, and even plan your next garden.

Herbs And Spices



Re-growing fresh herbs and spices are much easier than many might think and takes minimal supplies.


All that is needed is a medium sized container, fresh water, sunlight, and a fresh cutting of the herb or spice wanted or needed for your favorite recipes.


Trim all but the top two sets of leaves. Place in a few inches of fresh water. Now watch them grow. Once they have a nice new root base transfer them to a bit of soil. Soon you will have an all-new set of herbs and spices awaiting your use.




Below are some examples of herbs and spices that grow easily and are used frequently.
  1. Rosemary

  2. Chives

  3. Peppermint

  4. Sage

  5. Lemon Balm

  6. Oregano

  7. Thyme

  8. Basil

  9. Cilantro

  10. Garlic

Vegetables


Image result for Vegetable


Vegetables, much like the herbs and spices, can be grown again using the same materials. Some might also need toothpicks or dowels for best results. Below are some examples of the multitude of vegetables awaiting regrowth.

The primary difference, however, is the manner in which each vegetable must be prepped. Some require pruning, some just cut, and others yet deseeded. No matter which prep needed the outcome will be just as deliciously enjoyed.
  1. Carrot

  2. Bok Choy

  3. Turnips

  4. Onions

  5. Sweet Potato

  6. Celery

  7. Pepper

  8. Romaine Lettuce

  9. Potatoe

  10. Tomato

  11. Avocado

  12. Green Onion

  13. Leeks

  14. Pineapple

  15. Ginger

  16. Pumpkin

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Foods Specifically Designed for Prepping and Survival Situations

Getting Started

There are a lot of guides to be found online about how to prep food for survival and emergency situations. There are also guides to tell you which canned foods will last the longest and what will work best for a bug out bag or prepper's pantry. These are all very handy and should certainly be consulted if you are considering either one.

However, there are also several companies who specialize in foods that are meant to really go the distance. Some companies prepare and package food that will have as much as a twenty-five year shelf life. Certain foods are packaged so that they can easily be carried while others are meant to be used if you are "bugging in" instead of "bugging out".

Let's take an in-depth look at some of these food companies and what they offer. Follow the links provided to check out each company for yourself.

Meals Ready to Eat

Meals Ready to Eat, also known as MRE's, are one of the first foods that come to mind when thinking of survival situations. They were originally created by the United States military for our service people and they were made to provide the perfect nutrient-rich meals, while also being very easy and light to carry.

One of the best things about MRE's is the ability to eat them in a variety of ways. First, you can eat them cold, right from the package. While this isn't very pleasing to the taste, in most cases, it will certainly provide you with the needed nutrients to keep you going if need be. They can also be heated through using a camp stove, an MRE heater, or some other quick method.

When purchasing an MRE, you can choose to buy the complete meal, certain entrees, snacks, desserts, and even drinks. You can also purchase the MRE heaters separately, as well as buying complete cases for a bigger stockpile.

Following, are a few places where MRE's can be purchased. Of course, there are many more, but this should at least give you a place to get started.
The Wise Company has long been known as a trusted supplier of freeze dried and dehydrated foods that can easily be stored for long periods of time. Most of their foods can be prepared simply by adding water, so they are compact and easy to prepare. Campers have been using their products for years already, and many preppers are more than familiar with Wise.

These foods also come with a satisfactory twenty-five year shelf life, are premium quality and offer an affordable option to prepping per serving or per person. Make sure to read the packages carefully though, to make sure the serving size offered will be sufficient. Some have mentioned that a serving size isn't really that large, but we think it might be a personal taste choice. Either way, it never hurts to stay on top of things like this.

You can purchase food kits for 72-hours and one week, as well as increments of 1, 3, 6 and 12 month periods. You might be surprised at the variety of foods and entrees available from Wise, so make sure you check them out. While you're there, it might interest you to take a peek at their other supplies. They include:
  • Survival Kits
  • Water Storage
  • Water Filters
  • Fuel Sources
  • Stoves
  • Non-Hybrid Seeds
  • First Aid and Medical Kits
You can even request a free sample, here.


Mountain House

Mountain House is a company, much like The Wise Company, that provides meals for a variety of situations. Their endeavor into this business started by creating meals for the United States Military back in the Vietnam era. 

Some of the categories you will find when you visit their website are:
  • Breakfasts
  • Entrees
  • Meats
  • Sides
  • Desserts
  • Military Rations
  • Single Serving
  • Emergency Prep
If your order comes to more than $99, your shipping will be free if your product is defective in some way, they even offer returns. Their shelf life of thirty years comes with a taste guarantee as well, though you might note a change in the texture of the food after that amount of time.

Food kits that contain enough food for 2 to 14 days of supplies can be purchased quickly and easily and there's even a handy food supply calculator you can use if you need help figuring out how much to buy. With meal kits, pouches, buckets and cans, you're sure to be able to put together a kit that is as unique as you are.


Augason Farms

Augason Farms began over forty years ago with one single product, a milk alternative called Morning Moo. Now they serve emergency food rations and supplies that cover the entire food pyramid and have a shelf life of twenty-five years. Augason Farms offers packages for 72 hours all the way up to a year and offer some great food options, including:
  • Diary products including milk and butter
  • Bread mixes
  • Fruits and veggies
  • Oats, flour, meal, sugar, etc.
  • Pasta
  • Meat
  • Options that include vegetarian, gluten free and organic
Furthermore, you can order complete entrees as well as variety packs, suiting your needs perfectly. You can also order some handy supplies too. They offer a stainless steel water filtration system, a variety of grain grinders, emergency water storage kits and more. Orders of more than $200 get free shipping.


A Good Start

These are just a few of the options you have for emergency food supplies. While it is certainly not extensive, I hope that it has given you a good place to start. You can always shop around at various dealers, your local emergency preparedness stores or use online digital savings like Honey

Remember, in the event of a disaster or emergency, the grocery store is most likely to be the first place looters will hit. Especially those who have never considered prepping for such a thing. Even those who are only scavenging for life-saving food and water will be in the middle of all of this and will be putting themselves in great danger.

Don't be one of those who risk life and limb simply to eat. With a simple mouse-click, you can have just what you need to ride out the first few days, weeks, or even a year. Please plan ahead!