Showing posts with label comfort. Show all posts
Showing posts with label comfort. Show all posts

Sunday, November 12, 2017

33 Recommended Books For the Prepper and Survivalist




By Karen Roguski


Being a prepper, farmer, or survivalist can be difficult for those that are not ready and prepared. It takes knowledge of just about every detail that one might have or didn’t realize that they will need.


To help one be as knowledgeable as possible we have gathered together our recommended 33 books. These reading materials are to help ensure accurate and hopefully complete knowledge for the all - the beginner to the proficient.


  • Prepper Handbook: Road Map to Advanced Disaster Preparedness by JR Ray
  • Living Well on Practically Nothing by Edward H. Romney
  • The Encyclopedia of Country Living – by Carla Emery
  • Country Living by Carla Emery
  • The Urban Homestead by Kelly Coyne and Erik Knutzen
  • Just in Case by Kathy Harrison
  • Real World Survival by Richard Lowe Jr
  • Live Off The Land In The City And Country by Ragnar Benson
  • SHTF Prepping: The Proven Insider Secrets For Survival, Doomsday and Disaster Preparedness by Gavin Williams
  • Off The Grid Living by Oliver Stokes
  • The Self-Sufficiency Handbook by Alan Bridgewater
  • Back to Basics: A Complete Guide to Traditional Skills by Abigail R. Gehring
  • Crisis Preparedness Handbook by Jack A. Spigarelli
  • Countdown to Preparedness by Jim Cobb
  • SAS Survival Guide: How to Survive in the Wild, on Land or Sea by John 'Lofty' Wiseman
  • Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why by Laurence Gonzales
  • Prepper's Homesteading by Nathan Chester
  • Emergency Food Storage & Survival Handbook by Peggy Layton
  • Prepping Made Easy by Terry Garreth
  • Bushcraft 101: A Field Guide to the Art of Wilderness Survival by Dave Canterbury
  • Little House on the suburbs by Deanna Caswell, Daisy Siskins and Jacqueline Musser
  • Prepper: Complete Prepper’s Survival Guide And Self Sufficient Living by Greg Adams
  • The Home Survivalist's Handbook by Christopher "BigBear" Eastin  and  Ryan Acker
  • Prepping: How To Survive Off The Grid by Martin Luxtonberg
  • The Prepper's Workbook Scott B. Williams and Scott Finazz
  • Survival Hacks: Over 200 Ways to Use Everyday Items for Wilderness Survival by Creek Stewart
  • Survival Theory: A Preparedness Guide by Jonathan Hollerman
  • The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way by Joseph Alton and‎ Amy Alton
  • Practical Prepping (No Apocalypse Required) by Randall S Powers and Steven Konkoly
  • How To Survive The End Of The World by James Wesley Rawles
  • Doomsday Prepping Crash Course Book by Patty Hahne
  • Barnyard in your Backyard by Gail Damerow
  • PREPAREDNESS NOW! by Aton Edwards

One will find hundreds of additional topics, handbooks, tips and tricks books and PDF’s. Keep in mind that with new books coming out on a daily basis one's library will never be totally complete. With this in mind, we at Family Survival Farm hope that you will list any additional recommendations below.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

FIRE! FIRE! FIRE!

By: Sebastian Berry


DISCLAIMER: Fire is hot. As such it can burn you. It can also burn down your house. Don't be dumb and burn yourself or burn down your house. Also all pictures and video after this point are credited to the author.

Friends, in my never ending quest for survival skills and knowledge. One of my favorite things to learn and teach about is fire building. There is almost nothing more satisfying in the family survival situation than being able to produce fire. I can only imagine how cavemen felt when they were able to produce and contain fire. I'm pretty certain that if they were to see me as I build and contain fire my emotions and theirs would be pretty similar.

Of course, everyone knows about the importance of fire. The things it can be used for are numerous. Defense, heat, and cooking are my top three reasons and in that order. I won't elaborate heavily on my reasons but generally speaking a fire keeps things that go bump in the night away from you.  In the family survival scenario there is no telling what conditions or climate you may be in, making heat (along with shelter) important. Safe and warm are great things but do you little good if you are not able to prepare any food that you might have. Yes, I understand that a great many things can be eaten uncooked or raw but having a hot meal does wonders for personal comfort and mindset.

Fire needs three things in order to be fire...
  • Heat
  • Oxygen
  • Fuel
If either one of these three things is missing or taken away once a fire is established, the fire dies.

We all know there are many ways to start fire. Matches, lighters, fire strikers, magnesium bars, friction, or simply transporting a smolder from a previous location. In this post I am going to share my favorite family survival fire widget. I love wax dipped strike-anywhere matches.


In videos below you will be able to see the difference between a naked match and dipped matches. The difference in burn time is pretty drastic.
  • Single naked match burn time =   15-30 seconds
  • Single dipped match burn time=  2:30-3+ minutes
Dipping matches provides a couple of enhancements.
  • Waterproofing
  • Extra fuel
The dipping process takes a little bit of practice and a lot more patience.





I like to "soak" the matches in the wax to get a little base layer built up and let them cool. The real secret to dipping matches is to let the wax cool down to the point where it starts to solidify.


The wax as pictured above is almost too cool to dip but still worked well for me. I also have experimented with cotton and toilet paper wrapping with mixed results. I did not test the burn time on cotton wrapped and toilet paper wrapped.





You'll notice that I bundled matches together. This is what I like so much. A single dipped match provides a significantly longer burn time and burn stability as opposed to a naked match. I've found that for actual ease of making a fire, a bundle of four matches dipped together provides an enhanced profile for actually starting a fire.

Pro Tip: the wax must be completely removed down to the wood before striking
Here are the burn time videos: 
Spoiler alert: these are probably boring and you probably will hear my kids and neighbors in the background. I still think they are informative enough to show.

Single undipped match: ~20 second burn time

Single dipped match: ~3:30 burn time

4 match dipped bundle: able to build fire in less than 2 minutes

Anything worth doing is worth overdoing. This next video is two parts both are about 1:30 a piece. Total burn time on this mega match was about 12:30. It was 12 matches dipped together.



A few things I didn't mention earlier. I sourced the pot and the candle wax from a local thrift store for a total cost of $2. The strike anywhere matches came in a 3 pack at a local store for just under $5. Total project cost of less than $7 and I have enough survival matches for a while.

What are your favorite ways to start a fire? Let me know in the comments.