Saturday, May 5, 2018

Survival firearms

By: Sebastian Berry

In a departure from my normal survival medical instruction but keeping in line with my recent theme of firearms, this most current installment is a total opinion piece.

The debate has raged on since firearms have been around about calibers, stopping power (don't even get me started), ballistics, and design. I personally am not partial to any one caliber, brand, or style. Friends and neighbors ask me pretty regularly, what firearms should I have to be the best prepared?

My answers are more thought provoking than actual advice for a specific product or device or item. In no specific order I tell people the following things.
  • Have a firearm that you like.
    • You have to like what you have. Even if it's ugly. I own a .45 HiPoint brand pistol, yes that HiPoint. Find it on youtube, you will be thoroughly entertained.
  • Have a firearm that you will use.
    • I know people that own firearms and then never do anything with them. For whatever reason they get something and it never sees the light of day again. You have to use your tools and be familiar with it. When you really need it, you need to know how to use it.
  • Have a firearm you trust.
    • We all have favorites, of everything. A favorite drinking glass, a favorite shirt or pair of shoes, and even a favorite tool. You have to have a firearm that is your go-to. One that you know is a no-fail and will hit your target. EVERY. SINGLE. TIME.
Usually after that question and series of answers and explanations, I get the question repeated. What firearms should I have to be the best prepared? Again, my answers are more thought provoking than pointing to actual products.
  • You need a rifle or shotgun to hunt with.
    • When the time comes, and it will, you need a firearm that can put food on the table. Whether that is a .22 for taking small to small/medium game like squirrels, rabbits, and birds or a 12 gauge with shot or slugs for small to large game from turkeys to deer.
  • You need a rifle or shotgun for family defense.
    • The weapon you hunt with may not be mutually exclusive from the on you use for family defense.
    • I probably would recommend you have two separate weapons for hunting and for family defense.
  • You need a pistol for personal defense.
    • A .22 will kill you dead just a much as a .45. I am a non-believer in stopping power. Can you place shots on target? If you can place more shots on target with a .22 than anything else, then that is what you should use.
Be mindful, in the family survival scenario, firearms and ammunition may be in very short supply. Some of the more designer ammunition may be in even shorter supply. Your firearms and ammunition should be common and widespread. 

Below is the list of top selling ammunition from Federal for 2014:

1. .223 Remington/5.56mm NATO
2. .308 Winchester/7.62x51mm NATO
3. .30-’06 Springfield
4. .30-30 Winchester
5. .270 Winchester
6. .243 Winchester
7. .300 Winchester Magnum
8. 7mm Remington Magnum
9. 7.62x39
10. .300 Winchester Short Magnum
11. .22-250 Remington

I would be remiss if I did not point out that all of these are traditional hunting calibers. There will always be a place for .22LR and 00 buck. 

Keeping arms and ammunition in common calibers and in sufficient quantity will help you keep your family fed and safe when the time comes.

I am always open for comments. Have something to add, let us know!